Speakers share their stories of injustices

Poppy Murray has started a new campaign called Just BE LADS which aims to let men know what they can do to make a woman feel more at ease to show they are not a threat. Picture by Andrew Le Poidvin. (29365867)
Poppy Murray has started a new campaign called Just BE LADS which aims to let men know what they can do to make a woman feel more at ease to show they are not a threat. Picture by Andrew Le Poidvin. (29365867)

For years, she has perfected being able to avoid situations that will resonate with her own experience, becoming ‘a pro’ at pretending to be OK.

She spoke about being sexually assaulted by a family friend, being in an abusive relationship, and being attacked.

Kay Davidson spoke about her own experiences of sexual assault and how she has spent years dealing with her trauma, only recently breaking free of those feelings. Picture by Andrew Le Poidevin. (29366023)
Kay Davidson spoke about her own experiences of sexual assault and how she has spent years dealing with her trauma, only recently breaking free of those feelings. Picture by Andrew Le Poidevin. (29366023)

‘I spent too many years – that I cannot get back – as a victim.

‘Don’t wait to speak out. Until we do, how can we expect change to happen?,’ she said, urging people to seek help if an experience still haunts them.

After having two sets of therapy during lockdown, she said it was like finding the last two pieces of the puzzle.

‘I am no longer a victim, and I am more than a survivor. I am now free.’

One of the co-organisers of the vigil and peaceful protest, Sian Jones. Picture by Andrew Le Poidvin. (29365865)
One of the co-organisers of the vigil and peaceful protest, Sian Jones. Picture by Andrew Le Poidvin. (29365865)

The introduction of the Sexual Assault Referral Centre, which is due to be debated in the States this week, was, for many speakers, key to achieving the level of support needed to help victims.

Former head of the domestic abuse charity Safer, Carol Le Page, said it would be a safe space where forensic evidence could be taken and kept safe until the victim felt comfortable to go to the police and file an official report.

Stories of injustices were also told, with speakers saying they have to walk around local streets seeing their perpetrators.

The Rainbow Choir performed a thought-provoking song at the peaceful protest and vigil held for women who had been victims of misogyny and sexual assault. Picture by Andrew Le Poidvin. (29365863)
The Rainbow Choir performed a thought-provoking song at the peaceful protest and vigil held for women who had been victims of misogyny and sexual assault. Picture by Andrew Le Poidvin. (29365863)

A big worry for many was that the offenders had not being convicted and therefore had not learned their lesson.

Daisy Chapple said that was why educating people of all ages about consent and appropriate behaviours was crucial in leading the way for change.

One of the co-organisers of the vigil and peaceful protest, Daisy Chapple, spoke about her own experiences of sexual assault and urged people to actively challenge inappropriate behaviours to try and tackle the issue. Picture by Andrew Le Poidvin. (29365869)
One of the co-organisers of the vigil and peaceful protest, Daisy Chapple, spoke about her own experiences of sexual assault and urged people to actively challenge inappropriate behaviours to try and tackle the issue. Picture by Andrew Le Poidvin. (29365869)

‘Start holding your male friends accountable for their actions,’ she said.

‘Every man and every woman must do that because there will never be an end to these issues until we start actively making changes.’

Guernsey Press